初代スピーチ全文掲載

  • 2007.07.18 Wednesday
  • 19:30

本日はようこそおいでくださいました。 いつもありがとうございます。 さかえ屋の初代の越智 桂子です。
Welcome to our event. Thank you very much always for coming to our shop. I am Keiko Ochi one of the founders of Sakaeya.


いつも思うのですが、着物と浴衣は本当に美しく、華やかですね。
I always think how a kimono is beautiful and gorgeous.

そして日本人、外国人関係なくとてもお似合いになっています。
Kimonos suit everyone, regardless of nationality.


本当に今日は沢山の方々に、こうしてお集まり、いただけてとても嬉しく思っております。
I’m so pleased so many of you have decided to join us today.

このように外国の方に着物を着てもらうことがあるなんて、私の小さかったころには考えられませんでした。
Actually, when I was young I could not image foreigners would enjoy wearing kimonos.


それは、私が小学校のころ、日本は第二次世界大戦で、アメリカやヨーロッパの国々と戦っていたからです。
Because, at the time I was attending elementally school, Japan was fighting against the U.S. and several European countries during World Ward 2.


私は四国に住んでいましたが、造船所があったため、米軍の攻撃に会い、家族ばらばらになって逃げ惑ったことを今も覚えています。
Even through I lived in Shikoku, a large island south-east of mainland Japan, we encounters attacks there as well, and our family would run for our lives, one time even losing sight of each other.


その日は、田舎の親戚のうちに泊まり、次の日家族8人と徒歩で1時間かけて家にもどると、幸いにも家は焼け残っておりました。しかし、あのときの恐怖は今も忘れません。
Somehow we all managed to get to and stay at a relatives house in the coutry-side. The next day the eight of us walked back to our house by foot, walking for over an hour. Fortunately, our house hadn’t burned down, but even today I remember how frightened I wa.


戦争中は、電球をつけると、米軍の攻撃の対象になると、夕食の際には、電球に黒 カバーをかけて、そこで家族かたまって粗末な食事をしました。
During the war, we could not turn on the light―even during dinner―because it was said that American soldiers would spot us and attack. Therefore we put a black cover on the light and ate very simple food underneath this dim light.



私の家は酒屋を営んでいたので、食べ物がなくなるとお父さんがお酒を農家に売りに行きました。
My parents ran a liquor shop shop. So when we ran out of food, my father would go to a farmer’s house and ask to exchange liquor for their food.



ある日、父が「これが最後のウィスキーだ」といってお米に交換してきたことを思いだすと、涙が出ます。
One day, my father announced “ this is the last whiskey” and went to exchange it for rice. Whenever I remember this, I can’t help crying.


今日本はこんに豊かになりました。だからこそ、こうやって色とりどりの着物や浴衣が楽しめますが、あのころは食べることが精一杯。生きることが精一杯の毎日でした。
Today, Japan is a very prosperous country where we can enjoy things like colorful and fancy Kimonos and Yukatas, but in those days the main concern on everyone’s minds day after day was finding enough to eat. We were barely surviving.

私が5歳のとき、家族で満州、現在の中国のハルピンへ新天地を求め赴ききました。

When I was 5 years old, we moved to Manchuria, or what is now known as Northeast Asai, to look for a new and peaceful way of live. But in fact, life was not easy there either.

今は中国は日本のよきパートナーでありますが、そのときは両国の関係は複雑な状態でした。
Now China and Japan have a good relationships, but in those days the two countries had a very complicated relationship.


ですから、中国という海外に居ながらも、今のように海外旅行気分でその国の文化を知るチャンスもありませんでした。
So, even though I was living abroad, I didn’t have the opportunity to immerse myself in a new culture and enjoy living abroad, as many international travelers today can enjoy.


だからこうやって外国の皆さんが日本にいらして、日本の民族衣装である着物をお召しになっているのをみると、「なんと平和な世界になったのだろう」と感慨深いものがあります。
That is why, when I see foreigners come to Japan and enjoy wearing Kimonos and Yukatas, I can’t help but think at how peaceful the world has become.


1945年、天皇陛下がラジオで国民に向かい、敗戦を宣言しました。
In 1945, the Showa emperor declared Japan’s defeat in war to the citizens of Japan over radio.

11歳の私は日本は勝つと信じておりましたので、大変驚きながら、そのラジオを聴いていました。
As a 11 years old. I believed Japan would win so I was extremely surprised to hear that we had lost.


それから62年、焼け野原になった日本をここまで復興できたのは、
「戦争で死んでいった人たちのためにも、日本を豊かにしたい」という思いで、みなよく働き、よく勉強したからでしょう。
It’s been almost exactly 62 years since that day. The reason Japan was able to restore itself so strongly must surely because many survivors of the war believed they had to work and study hard not only for themselves but for the victims of war, who lost their lives for their country.


戦前生まれの私のような者たちには必ず、親戚や知人に、戦争で死亡した人を覚えています。
People who were born before the war, like me, will never forget those who lost their lives in the war.


私の亡き夫で、かほりの父栄は空軍での訓練を受けている間に終戦を迎えましたが、あと一歩遅ければ戦地に赴き、私と結婚することはなかったかもしれません。
In fact my late husband, Kahori’s father, was in the midst of air force training when Japan surrendered. But had the war continued, perhaps we would not have had gotten the chance to marry.


また、夫の兄は、一番の戦況の熾烈を極めた、東南アジアラオスへ出兵し、戦士しています。
My late husband’s old brother, in fact, fought in Laos in southeast Asia, where he was killed in action.


戦争で亡くなった方々に今日のこのパーティを見てもらったら、きっとみんな喜びますね。日本へ戦争のためくるのではなく、着物やその他の文化に魅せられて外国の人がいらっしゃるのですから。

If those who lost their lives in the war could see our party today, I think they would be pleased to know the people are coming to Japan not to fight, but because they are attracted to Japanese culture, like Kimonos.

私と夫と、夫の弟、伊都夫さんと共にこのさかえ屋を立ち上げたのが今から48年前。 日本が敗戦から抜け出し、経済大国へ第一歩を踏み出した時です。
It was 48 years ago, when my husband and his younger bother, OCHI Isthuto, and I started our Kimono shop, Sakaeya. It was just around the time when Japan was making its first step into becoming an economically stable country.



戦争中は「贅沢は敵だ」と良い着物を着ることは許されませんでし、「配給制」がとられていたので、新しい衣類を手に入れることも大変難しかしい状況でした。

そのため、日本経済が良くなり始めると、「おしゃれ」への願望がたかまり、さかえ屋は大変にぎわいました。

During the war, we ware not allowed to were nice Kimonos because that was a slogan during those times, “luxury is the enemy”. And the rationing system made it difficult get new clothes. Perhaps especially people were not allowed to wear nice clothes during this time, once the economy became better, many people wanted to wear nice clothes, and nice kimonos. So, Sakaeya became very popular.

しかし、その後、バブル経済が崩壊すると、着物のようなぜいたく品はなかなか売れず、苦労もしました。
However, after the bubble economy crumbled, luxurious products like the kimono were very had to sell.

そして4年前、お手ごろな価格で着物を提供できるよう、こうしてリサイクルの着物の販売を決断、それが軌道に乗ってくれました。
そして昨年にはお店を移転して、そして1周年になります。
Four year ago, we started sell inexpensive second hand Kimono and last year we moved to a new shop. And now it is our one year anniversary at this new location.


戦争を経験した73歳が私が思うことは、どんなことがあっても、人間が人間に向かって武器を持つことはいけないということです。私はぜひ世界に「武器ではなく着物を」とこの小さなお店から発信し続けていきたいと思っています。
From the perspective of a 73 years old woman, and someone who’s experienced war, no human should point a weapon at another human, no matter what. I would like to spread a message of peace to the world from my small kimono shop. My slogan of peace is “Choose Kimonos, Not Weapons”.


みなさま本当に今日はご参加をありがとうございました。
Thank you for listening, and thank you again for joining us today.






原案:越智 桂子
作文・編集:越智 香保利
英文翻訳: Suzy Newsy


引き続きのパーティの模様はこちらへ・・・>
http://2daime.kimono-sakaeya.com/?eid=690021
コメント
コメントする








    

calendar

S M T W T F S
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
293031    
<< October 2017 >>

さかえ屋呉服店

私のお店です Kimono Shop Sakaeya 東京店 http://kimono-sakaeya.com/Tokyo/

Facebook

https://www.facebook.com/sakaeya2daime/

selected entries

categories

archives

recent comment

recent trackback

links

profile

search this site.

others

mobile

qrcode

powered

無料ブログ作成サービス JUGEM